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Some say that trouble is my middle name lyrics by Mark-twain

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The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 33) - Mark Twain

... I crave your favour to carry my name to him, and say I beg to say a word in his ear?"         "I will despatch the business right willingly, fair sir."         "Then say Miles Hendon, son of Sir Richard, is here without?I shall be greatly ...

The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 17) - Mark Twain

... practise thy tongue to wary speech, that it may do no hurt when our quarters change. I have done a murder, and may not tarry at home?neither shalt thou, seeing I need thy service. My name is changed, for wise reasons; it ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 23) - Mark Twain

... name and stated the case. You don't know kings, Jim, but I know them; and this old rip of ourn is one of the cleanest I've struck in history. Well, Henry he takes a notion he wants to get up some trouble ...

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Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 13) - Mark Twain

... a bottomless crossing! The terror of it took my breath away.         'M-a-r-k three!... M-a-r-k three... Quarter less three!... Half twain!'         This was frightful! I seized the bell-ropes and stopped the engines.         'Quarter twain! Quarter twain! Mark' twain!         I was helpless. I did not know what ...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Chap. 25) - Mark Twain

... ?it's a girl." "It's all the same, I reckon; some says gal, some says girl?both's right, like enough. Anyway, what's her name, Tom?" "I'll tell you some time?not now." "All right?that'll do. Only if you get married I'll ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 20) - Mark Twain

... in a sweat again for a minute, being afraid there was going to be some more trouble amongst them; so we was pretty glad when the duke says: "'Tis my fate to be always ground into the mire under the iron heel ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.5) - Mark Twain

... 't go."         "Look you," said the Paladin, "it is easy to say that. Now I will tell you why I remain chafing here in a bloodless tranquillity which my reputation teaches you is repulsive to my nature. I do not go because I am not a gentleman ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 53) - Mark Twain

... silver, and cost great sums.         But the feature of the place is a short column that rises from the middle of the marble pavement of the chapel, and marks the exact centre of the earth. The most reliable traditions tell us ...

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Chap. 21) - Mark Twain

... , forasmuch as ye go to find that ye will not find, and seek that ye will seek in vain, my life being hostage for my word, and my word and message being these, namely: That a hap has happened whereof the ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 3) - Mark Twain

... dry so quick?'         'I don't know, sir. I'm always that way, mostly.'         'Oh, you are, are you. What's your name?'         I warn't going to tell my name. I didn't know what to say, so I just says?         'Charles William Allbright, sir.'         Then they roared?the ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 29) - Mark Twain

... up my master and was trying to get away before he made trouble with them. That was all they asked me. Then the doctor whirls on me and says: "Are you English, too?" I says yes; and him and some others ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 33) - Mark Twain

... but me. And that is, there's a nigger here that I'm a-trying to steal out of slavery, and his name is Jim?old Miss Watson's Jim." He says: "What! Why, Jim is?" He stopped and went to studying. I says: "I know what you ...

The Gilded Age (Chap. 33) - Mark Twain

... so much about me here that is novel and interesting that my days are made up more of sunshine than shadow."         "Washington is not a dull city in the season," said the young lady. "We have some very good society indeed ...

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The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 22) - Mark Twain

... refer to him in some way--so named, or some purchase rigged in some way to scrape a sort of hurrahing acquaintance with him. That seems to be the idea. To be on good terms with St. Mark, seems to be ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 11) - Mark Twain

... in my mind. It is only relevant in that it is connected with piloting. There used to be an excellent pilot on the river, a Mr. X., who was a somnambulist. It was said that if his mind was troubled about a bad piece ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 18) - Mark Twain

... gangs of men gallop past the log store with guns; so I reckoned the trouble was still a-going on. I was mighty downhearted; so I made up my mind I wouldn't ever go anear that house again, because I reckoned I was to blame, somehow. I judged ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 32) - Mark Twain

... much of his time instructing himself about Scriptural localities.?They say the Oracle complains, in this hot weather, lately, that the only beverage in the ship that is passable, is the butter. He did not mean butter, of course, but ...

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Chap. 11) - Mark Twain

... , no; and wherefore should I? Have I not a tongue, and cannot I say all that myself?"         "But your saying it, you know, and somebody else's saying it, is different."         "Different? How might that be? I fear me I do not understand."         "Don't understand ? Land of ...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 11) - Mark Twain

... . But now she says: "Honey, I thought you said it was Sarah when you first come in?" "Oh, yes'm, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah's my first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary." "Oh, that's the way of it ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 47) - Mark Twain

... " by the bribe of a present of cattle, what did the gorgeous son of the desert say?         "Nay, I have enough, my brother; keep that thou hast unto thyself!"         Esau found Jacob rich, beloved by wives and children, and traveling ...

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Chap. 18) - Mark Twain

... to their view. I only stand to this: I have noticed my conscience for many years, and I know it is more trouble and bother to me than anything else I started with. I suppose that in the beginning I prized it, because we prize anything ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.6) - Mark Twain

... upon a mystery of God?and what might my punishment be? I was afraid, and went deeper into the wood. Then I carved a mark in the bark of a tree, saying to myself, it may be that I am dreaming and have not seen this ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 19) - Mark Twain

... ?so what's the use to worry? Make the best o' things the way you find 'em, says I?that's my motto. This ain't no bad thing that we've struck here?plenty grub and an easy life?come, give us your hand ...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 25) - Mark Twain

... rascal out?I beg you to do it. Will you?" Mary Jane straightened herself up, and my, but she was handsome! She says: "Here is my answer." She hove up the bag of money and put it in the king's hands ...

The Gilded Age (Chap. 1) - Mark Twain

... of age, was sopping corn-bread in some gravy left in the bottom of a frying-pan and trying hard not to sop over a finger-mark that divided the pan through the middle?for the other side belonged to the brother ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 58) - Mark Twain

... longer than the greatest depth of St. Peter's at Rome?which is to say that each side of Cheops extends seven hundred and some odd feet. It is about seventy-five feet higher than the cross on St. Peter's. The ...

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Chap. 31) - Mark Twain

... new money was not only handsomely circulating, but its language was already glibly in use; that is to say, people had dropped the names of the former moneys, and spoke of things as being worth so many dollars or ...

Roughing It (Chap. 31) - Mark Twain

... ?I wish I may never stir if it wasn't."         "Well then why d'n't you say it? What did you come swellin' around that way for, and tryin' to raise trouble?"         "Why I didn't come swellin' around, Mr. Arkansas?I just?"         "I'm a liar am I! Ger-reat Caesar ...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 12) - Mark Twain

... is what he used to say, anyway. Mornings before daylight I slipped into cornfields and borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things if ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 31) - Mark Twain

... way which was one of my memories of that murderous night in my cabin?         'I didn't do it; upon my soul I didn't do it; and I tried to keep him from doing it; I did, as God is my witness. He did it ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 52) - Mark Twain

... him to keep an eye on me. When I had been there about a week Mr. Brown (that's his name) came in my room one nite and saw me reading the bible?he asked me if i was a Christian & i ...

The Gilded Age (Chap. 42) - Mark Twain

... is to say, you had to be either a knave or a?well, a fool?there was no middle ground. You are not a fool, Mr. Trollop."         "Miss Hawking you flatter me. But seriously, you do not forget that some of the best and ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 7) - Mark Twain

... it that way, and some states it different. Old Gibbons don't say nothing about it?just shirks it complete?Gibbons always done that when he got stuck?but there is Rolampton, what does he say? Why, he says that they ...

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The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Chap. 18) - Mark Twain

... about the case; so he says that her coming here instead of flying to a free state looks bad for me, and that if I don't find her for him, and that pretty soon, he will make trouble for me. I never believed ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 27) - Mark Twain

... Hall. R.N., writing fifty-five years ago, says?         'Here I caught the first glimpse of the object I had so long wished to behold, and felt myself amply repaid at that moment for all the trouble I had experienced in coming so far; and ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 2.39) - Mark Twain

... an hour before schedule time. Yes; and some say?"         "Noel Rainguesson, you are preparing yourself for trouble. I will say just one word to you, and it will be to your advantage to?"         I saw that the usual thing had got a start ...

Roughing It (Chap. 65) - Mark Twain

... convenient view), and bring you the mate to my Oahu in the morning, and contend that it is the same animal. If you make trouble, he will get out by saying it was not himself who made the bargain with ...

The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 4) - Mark Twain

... brought him only insult instead of information. He kept muttering to himself, "Offal Court?that is the name; if I can but find it before my strength is wholly spent and I drop, then am I saved?for his people will take me ...

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Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 2.6) - Mark Twain

... unless these Voices could prove their claim in some absolutely unassailable way? It was then that Joan said:         "I will give you a sign, and you shall no more doubt. There is a secret trouble in your heart which you speak of to ...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Chap. 13) - Mark Twain

... and braces! now my hearties!" "Aye-aye, sir!" "Hellum-a-lee?hard a port! Stand by to meet her when she comes! Port, port! Now, men! With a will! Stead-y-y-y!" "Steady it is, sir!" The raft drew beyond the middle of the river ...

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