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So here i am thankful that i'm incapable lyrics

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Thankful - Caedmon's Call

... who understands There is none who seek God, no not one, I said, "No not one" So here I am thankful that I'm incapable Of doin' any good on my own, yeah 'Cause we're all stillborn and dead ...

Why I Am So Clever - Friedrich Nietzsche

... opportunities of drinking from free flowing founts (Nice, Turin, Sils). In vino veritas: it seems that here once more I am at variance with the rest of the world about the concept "Truth??with me spirit ...

Under Western Eyes (Chap. 1) - Joseph Conrad

... with arguments. "And so?here you are," he muttered through his teeth. The other did not detect the tone of anger. Never suspected it. "Yes. And nobody knows I am here. You are the last person that could be suspected?should ...

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Excellent People (Full Text) - Anton Chekhov

... , perhaps our methods of resisting evil belong to the category of prejudices which have become so deeply rooted in us, that we are incapable of parting with them, and therefore cannot form a correct judgment of them." "How do you ...

Hamlet Act 4 - William Shakespeare

... , Cries cuckold to my father, brands the harlot Even here, between the chaste unsmirched brow Of my true mother. KING CLAUDIUS What is the cause, Laertes, That thy rebellion looks so giant-like? Let him go, Gertrude; do not fear ...

The Tempest Act 1 Scene 2 - William Shakespeare

... in this island we arrived; and here Have I, thy schoolmaster, made thee more profit Than other princesses can that have more time For vainer hours and tutors not so careful. MIRANDA Heavens thank you for't! And now, I pray you, sir ...

The Winter's Tale Act 4 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... How now, good fellow! why shakest thou so? Fear not, man; here's no harm intended to thee. AUTOLYCUS I am a poor fellow, sir. CAMILLO Why, be so still; here's nobody will steal that from thee: yet for the outside of thy ...

Why I Am So Wise - Friedrich Nietzsche

... for me no small difficulty in my relations with others? I am gifted with a sense of cleanliness the keenness of which is phenomenal; so much so that I can ascertain physiologically?that is to say smell?the proximity, nay the innermost core ...

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Essays of Michel de Montaigne (Chap. 1.56) - Michel de Montaigne

... ; the thief calls Him to his assistance, to deliver him from the dangers and difficulties that obstruct his wicked designs, or returns Him thanks for the facility he has met with in cutting a man's throat; at the door of ...

Essays of Michel de Montaigne (Chap. 3.10) - Michel de Montaigne

... the years wherein we kept another kind of account. So ancient and so long a custom challenges my adherence to it, so that I am constrained to be somewhat heretical on that point incapable of any, though corrective, innovation. My imagination, in ...

Essays of Michel de Montaigne (Chap. 3.12) - Michel de Montaigne

... with the strongest and most vigorous provisions. Let us thank fortune, that has not made us live in an effeminate, idle, and languishing age; some who could never have been so by other means will be made famous by their ...

Essays of Michel de Montaigne (Chap. 3.8) - Michel de Montaigne

... , we thrust out our claws. I could suffer myself to be rudely handled by my friend, so much as to tell me that I am a fool, and talk I know not of what. I love stout expressions amongst gentle men, and to ...

The Piazza Tales (Benito Cereno) - Herman Melville

... disorder. But, in fact, his reserve might, in some degree, have proceeded from design. If so, then here was evinced the unhealthy climax of that icy though conscientious policy, more or less adopted by all commanders of large ships, which ...

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The Laws (Part 2) - Plato

... skill. [Cleinias] How extraordinary! [Athenian] I should rather say, How statesmanlike, how worthy of a legislator! I know that other things in Egypt are not so well. But what I am telling you about music is true and deserving of consideration, because showing ...

The Republic (Book 1) - Plato

... teach himself, and goes about learning of others, to whom he never even says thank you. That I learn of others, I replied, is quite true; but that I am ungrateful I wholly deny. Money I have none, and therefore I pay in praise, which is ...

Critique of Pure Reason; Preface to the Second Edition - Immanuel Kant

... by means of the former, here again there are two courses open to me. Either, first, I may assume that the conceptions, by which I effect this determination, conform to the object?and in this case I am reduced to the same perplexity ...

Of the Dialectic of Pure Reason in defining the Conception of the “Summum Bonum” (Chap. 2.2) - Immanuel Kant

... the knowledge of the object, and we learn from this that they can never be used for a theory of supersensible beings, so that on this side they are quite incapable of being the foundation of a speculative knowledge, and their use ...

Transition from the common rational knowledge of morality to the philosophical - Immanuel Kant

... general, which alone is to serve the will as a principle, i.e., I am never to act otherwise than so that I could also will that my maxim should become a universal law. Here, now, it is the simple conformity to law in general, without ...

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English Traits (Chapter 14: Literature) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Plato and Aristotle, of grouping men in natural classes by an insight of general laws, so deep, that the rule is deduced with equal precision from few subjects or from one, as from ...

Representative Men: Seven Lectures (Chap. 7) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... say over again some old wife's fable, that has had possession of men's faith these thousand years. He may as well see if it is true as another. He sifts it. I am here, he would say, to be the measure ...

Lord Jim (Chap. 6) - Joseph Conrad

... night in high latitudes. Suddenly he says with a sort of a little sigh: 'I am going aft, and shall set the log at zero for you myself, so that there can be no mistake. Thirty-two miles more on this course and ...

The Secret Agent (Chap. 8) - Joseph Conrad

... of social revolution. ?Don?t you know what the police are for, Stevie? They are there so that them as have nothing shouldn?t take anything away from them who have.? She avoided using ...

Victory (Chap. 1.5) - Joseph Conrad

... . He doesn't care about that now.? ?Doesn't he?? ?Well, you can judge for yourself. He isn't here, is he? You take my word for it. Don't you bother about him. I am advising you as a friend.? ?Thank you,? said, Davidson, inwardly ...

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Absalom, Absalom! (Chapter VIII) - William Faulkner

... got you away from the place so you could hate it good and never forgive it in quiet and monotony (though not exactly in what you would call peace); that you were to thank God you didn?t remember anything about ...

Feathertop: A Moralized Legend - Nathaniel Hawthorne

... as high a one as Mother Rigby could be expected to attain?that feeble and torpid natures, being incapable of better inspiration, must be stirred up by fear. But here was the crisis. Should she fail in what she now sought ...

Rappaccini's Daughter - Nathaniel Hawthorne

... with a human affection; for, alas!?hast thou not suspected it??there was an awful doom." Here Giovanni frowned so darkly upon her that Beatrice paused and trembled. But her faith in his tenderness reassured her, and made her ...

Wuthering Heights (Chap. 12) - Emily Brontë

... I might watch her. ?Don?t you see that face?? she inquired, gazing earnestly at the mirror. And say what I could, I was incapable of making her comprehend it to be her own; so I rose and covered it with a shawl. ?It?s behind there ...

Wuthering Heights (Chap. 14) - Emily Brontë

... reason, she has borne with you hitherto: but now that you say she may go, she?ll doubtless avail herself of the permission. You are not so bewitched, ma?am, are you, as to remain with him of your own ...

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The Sorrows of Young Werther (Book I) - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and ...

The Sorrows of Young Werther (Book II) - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... answered, "He has been as calm as he is at present for about six months. I thank Heaven that he has so far recovered: he was for one whole year quite raving, and chained down in a madhouse. ...

From The Diary Of A Violent-Tempered Man (Full Text) - Anton Chekhov

... ! . . . Mind you love her well. . . . Remember the sacrifice she is making for your sake!" And here I am at my wedding. At the moment I write these last words, my best man is at ...

The Cherry Orchard (Act 2) - Anton Chekhov

... , but I've never met such frivolous people as you before, or anybody so unbusinesslike and peculiar. Here I am telling you in plain language that your estate will be sold, and you don't seem to understand. LUBOV. What are we ...

A Fresh Light (Chap. 4) - Marcel Proust

... them devoured, more savagely than anyone, by those same weaknesses which they have succeeded so completely in concealing or conquering that we reckon them incapable not only of having ever been attacked by them themselves, but even of ever excusing ...

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Madame Swann at Home (Chapter 1) - Marcel Proust

... spectators, as one is when in the thick of a crowd; now I registered the fact that, on the contrary, thanks to an arrangement which is, so to speak, symbolical of all spectatorship, everyone feels himself to be the centre of the ...

Overture - Marcel Proust

... very carefully first the exact spot on her cheek where I would imprint it, and would so prepare my thoughts that I might be able, thanks to these mental preliminaries, to consecrate the whole of the minute Mamma would allow me ...

Overture [Chapter 1] - Marcel Proust

... very carefully first the exact spot on her cheek where I would imprint it, and would so prepare my thoughts that I might be able, thanks to these mental preliminaries, to consecrate the whole of the minute Mamma would allow me ...

Venice(Chap. 3) - Marcel Proust

... a flooded city. But with churches as with gardens, thanks to the same transposition as in the Grand Canal, the sea formed so effective a way of communication, a substitute for street or alley, that on either side of the Canaletto the churches ...

The Tempest, Act 1 - Masterworks of Brit Lit

... in this island we arrived; and here Have I, thy schoolmaster, made thee more profit Than other princesses can that have more time For vainer hours and tutors not so careful. MIRANDA Heavens thank you for't! And now, I pray you, sir ...

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The Marx-Engels Reader (Chapter 1.11: Society and Economy in History) - Robert C. Tucker

... high-sounding words as : Universal Reason, God, etc.¬is he not implicitly and necessarily admitting that he is incapable of understanding economic development?      What is society, whatever its form may be? The product of ...

Herman Melville's “Benito Cereno” - Dr. Katy Evans

... disorder. But, in fact, his reserve might, in some degree, have proceeded from design. If so, then here was evinced the unhealthy climax of that icy though conscientious policy, more or less adopted by all commanders of large ships, which ...

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