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It drives me lyrics by William-shakespeare

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Venus and Adonis - William Shakespeare

... it yield me still so bad a harvest. I leave it to your honourable survey, and your honour to your heart's content; which I wish may always answer your own wish and the world's hopeful expectation. Your honour's in all duty, WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ...

Henry IV Part 1 Act 2 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... grown out of two! FALSTAFF But, as the devil would have it, three misbegotten knaves in Kendal green came at my back and let drive at me; for it was so dark, Hal, that thou couldst not see thy hand ...

Hamlet Act 3 - William Shakespeare

... and see the matter. KING CLAUDIUS With all my heart; and it doth much content me To hear him so inclined. Good gentlemen, give him a further edge, And drive his purpose on to these delights. ROSENCRANTZ We shall, my lord ...

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All's Well That Ends Well Act 2 Scene 5 - William Shakespeare

... my particular. Prepared I was not For such a business; therefore am I found So much unsettled: this drives me to entreat you That presently you take our way for home; And rather muse than ...

A Funeral Elegy - William Shakespeare

... court opinion in my deep'st unrest. But whether doth the stream of my mischance Drive me beyond myself, fast friend, soon lost, Long may thy worthiness thy name advance Amongst the ...

Hamlet Act 3 Scene 2 - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with You:--why do you go about to recover the wind of me, As if you would drive me into a toil? GUILDENSTERN O, my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

Hamlet--Act 3, scene 2 (Griner) - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with you- why do you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me into a toil? Guil. O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

Hamlet Act 3 Scene 2 (Johnson) - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with you- why do you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me into a toil? Guil. O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

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Hamlet Act 3 Scene 2_Records - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with you:?why do you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me into a toil? GUILDENSTERN O, my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

Hamlet Act 3, Scene 2 (Stevens) - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with you:?why do you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me into a toil? GUILDENSTERN O, my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

King John Act 3 Scene 3 - William Shakespeare

... upon: Use our commission in his utmost force. BASTARD Bell, book, and candle shall not drive me back, When gold and silver becks me to come on. I leave your highness. Grandam, I will pray, If ever I remember to be holy ...

Othello 2, 3 - William Shakespeare

... your reputation thus And spend your rich opinion for the name Of a night-brawler? give me answer to it. MONTANO Worthy Othello, I am hurt to danger: 195 Your officer, Iago, can inform you,-- While I ...

Othello Act 2 Scene 3 - William Shakespeare

... your reputation thus And spend your rich opinion for the name Of a night-brawler? give me answer to it. MONTANO Worthy Othello, I am hurt to danger: Your officer, Iago, can inform you,-- While I spare ...

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Pericles, Prince of Tyre Act 2 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... charge, even as he left his life, 'Keep it, my Pericles; it hath been a shield Twixt me and death;'--and pointed to this brace;-- 'For that it saved me, keep it; in like necessity-- The which the gods protect thee ...

Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 5 - William Shakespeare

... tell them merrily; If good, thou shamest the music of sweet news By playing it to me with so sour a face. NURSE I am a-weary, give me leave awhile: Fie, how my bones ache! what a jaunt have I had! JULIET I would thou ...

The Merchant of Venice Act 4 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... well I have deserved the ring, She would not hold out enemy for ever, For giving it to me. Well, peace be with you! Exit Portia and Nerissa ANTONIO My Lord Bassanio, let him ...

The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Act 3,Scene 2) - William Shakespeare

... one. To withdraw with you- why do you go about to recover the wind of me, as if you would drive me into a toil?   GUILDENSTERN O my lord, if my duty be too bold, my love is too ...

Timon of Athens Act 5 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... thee the figures of their love, Ever to read them thine. TIMON You witch me in it; Surprise me to the very brink of tears: Lend me a fool's heart and a woman's eyes, And I'll beweep these comforts, worthy senators. FIRST ...

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Twelfth Night Act 2 Scene 5 - William Shakespeare

... -gartered; and in this she manifests herself to my love, and with a kind of injunction drives me to these habits of her liking. I thank my stars I am happy. I will be strange, stout, ...

Twelfth Night Act 3 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... deliver his challenge by word of mouth; set upon Aguecheek a notable report of valour; and drive the gentleman, as I know his youth will aptly receive it, into a most hideous opinion of his rage, skill, fury and impetuosity. This will so ...

Henry IV Part 2 Act 2 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... done the part of a careful friend and a true subject, and thy father is to give me thanks for it. No abuse, Hal: none, Ned, none: no, faith, boys, none. PRINCE HENRY See now, whether ...

Henry VI Part 1 Act 1, Scene 5 - William Shakespeare

... alarum again: and TALBOT pursueth the DAUPHIN, and driveth him: then enter JOAN LA PUCELLE, driving Englishmen before her, and exit after them then re-enter TALBOT TALBOT Where is my ...

Antony and Cleopatra Act 1 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... wounds thine honour that I speak it now-- Was borne so like a soldier, that thy cheek So much as lank'd not. LEPIDUS 'Tis pity of him. OCTAVIUS CAESAR Let his shames quickly Drive him to Rome: 'tis time we twain Did ...

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Cymbeline Act 4 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... going: newness Of Cloten's death--we being not known, not muster'd Among the bands--may drive us to a render Where we have lived, and so extort from's that Which we have ...

Henry VI Part 1 Act 1 Scene 3 - William Shakespeare

... , To slay thy brother Abel, if thou wilt. GLOUCESTER I will not slay thee, but I'll drive thee back: Thy scarlet robes as a child's bearing-cloth I'll use to carry thee out ...

JC Act 1 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... ceremonies. MARULLUS. May we do so? You know it is the feast of Lupercal. FLAVIUS. It is no matter; let no images Be hung with Caesar?s trophies. I?ll about And drive away the vulgar from the streets; So do you ...

Julius Caesar Act 1 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... ceremonies. MARULLUS May we do so? You know it is the feast of Lupercal. FLAVIUS It is no matter; let no images Be hung with Caesar's trophies. I'll about, And drive away the vulgar from the streets: So do you ...

Two Gentlemen of Verona Act 2 Scene 3 - William Shakespeare

... , and the tied! Why, man, if the river       were dry, I am able to fill it with my tears; if the       wind were down, I could drive the boat with my sighs. PANTHINO       Come, come away, man; I was sent to call thee ...

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All's Well That Ends Well Act 1 Scene 3 - William Shakespeare

... your honest care: I will speak with you further anon. Exit Steward Enter HELENA Even so it was with me when I was young: If ever we are nature's, these are ours; this thorn Doth to ...

All's Well That Ends Well Act 3 Scene 2 - William Shakespeare

... Those tender limbs of thine to the event Of the none-sparing war? and is it I That drive thee from the sportive court, where thou Wast shot at with fair eyes, to be ...

Antony and Cleopatra Act 3 Scene 6 - William Shakespeare

... we in negligent danger. Cheer your heart; Be you not troubled with the time, which drives O'er your content these strong necessities; But let determined things to destiny Hold unbewail'd their ...

Comedy of Errors Act 2 Scene 2 - William Shakespeare

... , sir, for God's sake: now your jest is earnest: Upon what bargain do you give it me? ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE. Because that I familiarly sometimes Do use you for my fool, and chat ...

Cymbeline Act 3 Scene 4 - William Shakespeare

... for the purpose where, if thou fear to strike and to make me certain it is done, thou art the pandar to her dishonour and equally to me disloyal.' PISANIO What shall I need to draw my sword? the paper Hath ...

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Hamlet Act 2 - William Shakespeare

... Striking too short at Greeks; his antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command: unequal match'd, Pyrrhus at Priam drives; in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword The ...

Hamlet Act 2 Scene 2 - William Shakespeare

... Striking too short at Greeks; his antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command: unequal match'd, Pyrrhus at Priam drives; in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword The ...

Hamlet--Act 2, scene 2, lines 383-610 (Griner) - William Shakespeare

... , Striking too short at Greeks. His antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command. Unequal match'd, Pyrrhus at Priam drives, in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword Th ...

Hamlet Act 2 Scene 2 lines 383-610 (Johnson) - William Shakespeare

... , Striking too short at Greeks. His antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command. Unequal match'd, Pyrrhus at Priam drives, in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword Th ...

Hamlet Act 2, Scene 2, Lines 383-610 (Stevens) - William Shakespeare

... Striking too short at Greeks; his antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command: unequal match?d, Pyrrhus at Priam drives; in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword The ...

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Hamlet Act 2 Scene 2_Records - William Shakespeare

... Striking too short at Greeks; his antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command: unequal match?d, Pyrrhus at Priam drives; in rage strikes wide; But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword The ...

Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 - William Shakespeare

... and see the matter. KING CLAUDIUS With all my heart; and it doth much content me To hear him so inclined. Good gentlemen, give him a further edge, And drive his purpose on to these delights. ROSENCRANTZ We shall, my lord ...

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