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I said a man these days lyrics by Ralph-waldo-emerson

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Self-Reliance - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... , and therefore of an old immaculate pedigree, even if shown in a young person. I hope in these days we have heard the last of conformity and consistency. Let the words be gazetted and ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 4) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... the world, overloads him with bias, sacrificing his symmetry to his working power. It is said, no man can write but one book; and if a man have a defect, it is apt to leave its impression on all his performances. If ...

Society and Solitude (Chap. 5) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... shoulders he rides, and pulls the hair of laurelled heads. "The childhood," said Milton, "shows the man, as morning shows the day." The child realizes to every man his own earliest remembrance, and so supplies a defect in our education, or ...

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Spiritual Laws (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... correction is a constant force, which, as a tendency, reaches through our lifetime. The object of the man, the aim of these moments, is to make daylight shine through him, to suffer the law to traverse his ...

English Traits (Chapter 16: Stonehenge) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... of it. He wishes to go through the British Museum in silence, and thinks a sincere man will see something, and say nothing. In these days, he thought, it would become an architect to consult only the grim necessity, and say ...

English Traits (Chapter 1: First Visit to England) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... orchard;" and did not even omit to remark the similar termination of their names. "A great man," he said, "should make great sacrifices, and kill his hundred oxen, without knowing whether they would be ...

The Transcendentalist - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... from the working to the speculative reformer, to escape that same slight ridicule. Alas for these days of derision and criticism! We call the Beautiful the highest, because it appears to us ...

Man the Reformer - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... shall be rich to great purposes; poor only for selfish ones. Now what help for these evils? How can the man who has learned but one art, procure all the conveniences of life honestly? Shall we ...

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New England Reformers - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... ideal in actual individualism. I pass to the indication in some particulars of that faith in man, which the heart is preaching to us in these days, and which engages the more regard, from the consideration, that the speculations of one ...

Literary Ethics - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... roar of cannonades in the Milanese, and marches in Germany. He is curious concerning that man's day. What filled it? the crowded orders, the stern decisions, the foreign despatches, the Castilian etiquette? ...

English Traits (Chapter 7: Truth) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... have a horror of adventurers in or out of Parliament. The ruling passion of Englishmen, in these days, is, a terror of humbug. In the same proportion, they value honesty, stoutness, and adherence to ...

Intellect (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... choice between truth and repose. Take which you please,?you can never have both. Between these, as a pendulum, man oscillates. He in whom the love of repose predominates will accept the first creed, the ...

Circles (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... . For me, commerce is of trivial import; love, faith, truth of character, the aspiration of man, these are sacred; nor can I detach one duty, like you, from all other duties, and concentrate ...

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Plato; Or, The Philosopher - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... , in the splendors of genius and intellectual achievement. "The whole of life, O Socrates," said Glauco, "is, with the wise the measure of hearing such discourses as these." What a price he sets on the feats of talent, on the powers of ...

Representative Men: Seven Lectures (Chap. 2) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Orion, as when measuring the angles of an acre. But the Republic of Plato, by these expansions, may be said to require, and so to anticipate, the astronomy of Laplace. The expansions are organic. The ...

Excerpt “Self Reliance” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Excerpts from ?Self-Reliance? By Ralph Waldo Emerson I read the other day some verses written by an eminent painter which were original and not conventional. The soul ...

History - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... this mind history is the record. Its genius is illustrated by the entire series of days. Man is explicable by nothing less than all his history. Without hurry, without rest, the human ...

Manners (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... were children playing with children in a wide field of flowers. Steep us, we cried, in these influences, for days, for weeks, and we shall be sunny poets, and will write out in many-colored ...

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Representative Men: Seven Lectures (Chap. 6) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... working kings, from Ulysses to William of Orange, but none who accomplished a tithe of this man's performance. To these gifts of nature, Napoleon added the advantage of having been born to a private and humble ...

Society and Solitude (Chap. 7) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... learn that as soon as the irrecoverable years have woven their blue glory between to-day and us these passing hours shall glitter and draw us as the wildest romance and the homes of ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 3) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... economy in a state or an individual will forget its frugality in behalf of claims like these. Whilst it is each man's interest, that, not only ease and convenience of living, but also wealth or surplus product ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 6) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... , poetry. Was never stoicism so stern and exigent as this shall be. It shall send man home to his central solitude, shame these social, supplicating manners, and make him know that much of the time he must have ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 7) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... souls with meanness and mopings, and with ministration to its voracity of trifles. Dr. Johnson said severely, "Every man is a rascal as soon as he is sick." Drop the cant, and treat it sanely. ...

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Compensation (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... in every particle. There is somewhat that resembles the ebb and flow of the sea, day and night, man and woman, in a single needle of the pine, in a kernel of corn, in each individual ...

English Traits (Chapter 11: Aristocracy) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... -four persons sent three hundred and seven members to Parliament. The borough-mongers governed England. These large domains are growing larger. The great estates are absorbing the small freeholds. In 1786, ...

English Traits (Chapter 4: Race) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... of the following ages has not quite effaced these traits of Odin; as the rudiment of a structure matured in the tiger is said to be still found unabsorbed in the Caucasian man. The nation has a tough, acrid, animal nature, which ...

English Traits (Chapter 5: Ability) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... security? whilst, in France, `fraternity,' `equality,' and `indivisible unity,' are names for assassination. Montesquieu said, "England is the freest country in the world. If a man in England had as many enemies as hairs on his head, no harm would happen ...

Experience - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... hollow and haggard, and pronounce them failures, ? not heroes, but quacks, ? conclude very reasonably, that these arts are not for man, but are disease. Yet nature will not bear you out. Irresistible nature made men such, ...

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Experience (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... hollow and haggard, and pronounce them failures, ? not heroes, but quacks, ? conclude very reasonably, that these arts are not for man, but are disease. Yet nature will not bear you out. Irresistible nature made men such, ...

Society and Solitude (Chap. 4) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Caesar said to Metellus, when that tribune interfered to hinder him from entering the Roman treasury, "Young man, it is easier for me to put you to death than to say that I will ;" and the youth yielded. I n earlier days, he ...

The American Scholar - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... verdict Reason from her inviolable seat pronounces on the passing men and events of to-day, - this he shall hear and promulgate. These being his functions, it becomes him to feel all confidence in himself, and to defer ...

The Over-Soul - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... spiritual nature, to the attributes of God. Justice we see and know, Love, Freedom, Power. These natures no man ever got above, but they tower over us, and most in the moment when our ...

English Traits (Chapter 10: Wealth) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... stronger by one thread, the band which war will have to cut. The introduction of these elements gives new resources to existing proprietors. A sporting duke may fancy that the state depends ...

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Harvard Divinity School Address - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... , in India, in China. Europe has always owed to oriental genius, its divine impulses. What these holy bards said, all sane men found agreeable and true. And the unique impression of Jesus upon mankind, ...

Nature (Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... bribe and invite; not kings, not palaces, not men, not women, but these tender and poetic stars, eloquent of secret promises. We heard what the rich man said, we knew of his villa, his grove, his wine, and his company ...

Nature (Short Essay) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... bribe and invite; not kings, not palaces, not men, not women, but these tender and poetic stars, eloquent of secret promises. We heard what the rich man said, we knew of his villa, his grove, his wine, and his company ...

Society and Solitude (Chap. 1) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... some extraordinary confessions. " Do you not see," he said, " the penalty of learning, and that each of these scholars whom you have met at S-, though he were to be the last man, would, like the executioner in Hood's poem, guillotine ...

Society and Solitude (Chap. 2) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... gradually extinguished rather than civilized. The Indians of this country have not learned the white man's work ; and in Africa the negro of to-day is the negro of Herodotus. In other races the growth is not arrested, but the ...

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The Conduct of Life (Chap. 8) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... came of the falsetto of their voicing. An Indian prince, Tisso, one day riding in the forest, saw a herd of elk sporting. "See how happy," he said, "these browsing elks are! Why should not priests, lodged and fed comfortably in ...

The Conservative - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... although this bifold fact lies thus united in real nature, and so united that no man can continue to exist in whom both these elements do not work, yet men are not philosophers, but are rather very foolish children ...

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