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Face to face lyrics by Thomas-hardy

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I look in her face - Thomas Hardy

I look in her face and say, ?Sing as you used to sing About Love?s blossoming?; But she hints not Yea or Nay. ?Sing, then, that Love?s a ...

“I Rose And Went To Rou'tor Town” - Thomas Hardy

... gaiety and good heart. When sojourn soon at Rou'tor Town         Wrote sorrows on my face,         I strove that none should trace The pale and gray, once pink and brown, When sojourn ...

The Masked Face - Thomas Hardy

... firm-fixed floor,         That I knew not of before?"         "It is Life," said a mask-clad face. I asked: "But how do I come here,         Who never wished to come; Can the light and air be made more clear,         The floor more quietsome,         And ...

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To Carrey Clavel - Thomas Hardy

You turn your back, you turn your back,          And never your face to me, Alone you take your homeward track,          And scorn my company. What will you ...

To Life - Thomas Hardy

... , And feign like truth, for one mad day,         That Earth is Paradise? I'll tune me to the mood,         And mumm with thee till eve; And maybe what as interlude         I feign, I shall ...

An Appeal To America On Behalf Of The Belgian Destitute - Thomas Hardy

... their loud need: We know that nearer first your duty lies; But?is it much to ask that you let plead Your lovingkindness with you?wooing-wise - Albeit that aught you ...

England To Germany In 1914 - Thomas Hardy

... , Save a flushed few whose blatant mood You heard and marked as well as we To tongue not in their country's key; But yet you cry with face aflame, "O England, may God punish thee!" And foul in onward history, And present ...

I worked no wile to meet you - Thomas Hardy

... At such a date and place, Constraint alone had won you          Vision of my strange face! You did not seek to see me          Then or at all, you said, - Meant passing when you neared me,        & ...

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Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 2.6) - Thomas Hardy

... between them,? said Fancy, also looking at the two clocks. ?Better stick to Thomas,? said her father. ?There?s a healthy beat in Thomas that would lead a man to swear by en offhand. He is as true as the town time. How ...

Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 5.1) - Thomas Hardy

... the time looking fixedly in the tranter?s face as if he were a looking-glass. The furniture had undergone attenuation to an alarming extent, every duplicate piece having been removed, including the clock by Thomas Wood; Ezekiel Saunders being at last ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 6) - Thomas Hardy

... a shepherd, ma'am?"         She lifted the wool veil tied round her face, and looked all astonishment. Gabriel and his cold-hearted darling, Bathsheba Everdene, were face to face.         Bathsheba did not speak, and he mechanically repeated in an abashed and ...

Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 2.4) - Thomas Hardy

... and old William looked in the same direction, apparently under the impression that the things? faces alluded to were there visible. ?What I have been thinking??the tranter implied by this use of the ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 1.2) - Thomas Hardy

... neither whisker nor moustache, which allowed the soft curves of the lower part of his face to be apparent. His lips were thin, and though, as it seemed, compressed by thought, there ...

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The Mayor of Casterbridge (Chap. 41) - Thomas Hardy

... indifferently, and shook his head. "Well?perhaps you may not. My name is Newson." Henchard's face and eyes seemed to die. The other did not notice it. "I know the name well," Henchard said at last, ...

Domicilium - Thomas Hardy

... a wish (If we may fancy wish of trees and plants) To overtop the apple trees hard-by Red roses, lilacs, variegated box Are there in plenty, and such hardy flowers As flourish best untrained. Adjoining these Are herbs and esculents ...

Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 1.6) - Thomas Hardy

... mind! Let ?em sing too??twill make it all the louder?hee, hee!? said Leaf. ?Thomas Leaf, Thomas Leaf! Where have you lived all your life?? said grandfather William sternly. The quailing Leaf ...

Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 2.3) - Thomas Hardy

... . ?He?s so terrible silly that he might ruin the concern.? ?He don?t want to go much; do ye, Thomas Leaf?? said William. ?Hee-hee! no; I don?t want to. Only a teeny bit!? ?I be mortal afeard, Leaf, that you?ll never be ...

Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 5.2) - Thomas Hardy

... thy story, Leaf,? said the tranter. ?I never knew you were clever enough to tell a story. Silence, all of ye! Mr. Leaf will tell a story.? ?Tell your story, Thomas Leaf,? said grandfather William in the tone of a schoolmaster. ?Once,? said the ...

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Under the Greenwood Tree (Chap. 1.1) - Thomas Hardy

... , his arms dangling nervelessly in the wind as if they were empty sleeves. This was Thomas Leaf. ?Where be the boys?? said Dick to this somewhat indifferently-matched assembly. The eldest of the group, Michael Mail, cleared his throat ...

Apology - Thomas Hardy

... , speaks, with some rather gross instances of the suggestio falsi in his article, of ?Mr. Hardy refusing consolation,? the ?dark gravity of his ideas,? and so on. When a Positivist and a Catholic ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 3) - Thomas Hardy

... persons who go about the shires with eyes for beauty, that in Englishwoman a classically-formed face is seldom found to be united with a figure of the same pattern, the highly-finished features being generally too ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 53) - Thomas Hardy

... that can be said of very few. Ay, all the harm she thinks she says to yer face: there's nothing underhand wi' her."         They stood silent then, every man busied with his own ...

Jude the Obscure (Chap. 3.7) - Thomas Hardy

... ?and on turning the corner they found themselves close to a grey perpendicular church with a low-pitched roof?the church of St. Thomas. ?That's the church,? said Jude. ?Where I am going to be married?? ?Yes.? ?Indeed!? she exclaimed with curiosity. ?How ...

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Jude the Obscure (Chap. 5.4) - Thomas Hardy

... very volatile essence, their love for each other, was supposed to be made permanent, her face seemed to grow painfully apprehensive. ?Names and Surnames of the Parties??(they were to be parties now, not lovers, she thought). ?Condition??(a horrid idea ...

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, a Pure Woman (Chap. 21) - Thomas Hardy

... their comments there was a quick movement behind their backs, and they looked round. Tess, pale-faced, had gone to the door. "How warm 'tis to-day!" she said, almost inaudibly. It was warm, and none of them connected her withdrawal ...

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, a Pure Woman (Chap. 43) - Thomas Hardy

... , the whole field was in colour a desolate drab; it was a complexion without features, as if a face, from chin to brow, should be only an expanse of skin. The sky wore, in another colour, the ...

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, a Pure Woman (Chap. 59) - Thomas Hardy

... she, but with the same beautiful eyes?Clare's sister-in-law, 'Liza-Lu. Their pale faces seemed to have shrunk to half their natural size. They moved on hand in hand, and never spoke a word, the ...

The Mayor of Casterbridge (Chap. 1) - Thomas Hardy

... of the child in reply. The chief?almost the only?attraction of the young woman's face was its mobility. When she looked down sideways to the girl she became pretty, and even handsome, particularly that in the action her features ...

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The Return of the Native (Chap. 1.3) - Thomas Hardy

... , well I can mind when I was married how I zid thy father's mark staring me in the face as I went to put down my name. He and your mother were the couple married just afore we ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 1.5) - Thomas Hardy

... were alone, and the door closed, Thomasin said, turning up her pale, tearful face to him, "It is killing me, this, Damon! I did not mean to part from you in anger at Anglebury this morning; but I was frightened and hardly ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 1.6) - Thomas Hardy

... Rainbarrow and of Wildeve in the valley below. A faint illumination from its rays began to glow upon her face, and the fire soon revealed itself to be lit, not on the level ground, but on a salient corner or redan of ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 2.7) - Thomas Hardy

... standing with the woman in the porch, came forward from the house till he was face to face with Venn. It was Wildeve again. "Man alive, you've been quick at it," said ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 3.4) - Thomas Hardy

... on every line and curve in it! Only a few hairbreadths make the difference between this face and faces I have seen many times before I knew you; yet what a difference?the difference between everything and ...

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The Return of the Native (Chap. 5.2) - Thomas Hardy

... ." Clym started up, and Susan smiled in an expectant way which did not embellish her face; it seemed to mean, "Something sinister is coming!" "What did she do at my house?" "She went and ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 5.3) - Thomas Hardy

... back from the dressing-table, retreated a few steps from him, and looked him in the face. "Ah! you think to frighten me," she said, with a slight laugh. "Is it worth while? I am undefended, and alone." " ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 15) - Thomas Hardy

... during the shake of the head; Henery meanwhile retained several marks of despair upon his face, to imply that they would be required for use again directly he should go on speaking.          " ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 16) - Thomas Hardy

... suspense. At length there was a titter. But the soldier never moved. There he stood, his face to the south-east, upright as a column, his cap in his hand.         The clock ticked on. ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 40) - Thomas Hardy

... became visible a dim white shape; it was another milestone. She drew her fingers across its face to feel the marks.         "Two more!" she said.         She leant against the stone as a means of ...

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Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 41) - Thomas Hardy

... for you! And now you sneer at my foolishness in marrying you. O! is it kind to me to throw my mistake in my face? Whatever opinion you may have of my wisdom, you should not tell me of it ...

Far from the Madding Crowd (Chap. 43) - Thomas Hardy

... . "What is it makes you cry so, ma'am; has anything hurt you?" She came to Bathsheba's side with a face full of sympathy.         "No, Liddy?I don't want you any more. I can hardly say why I have ...

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