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Face to face lyrics by Mark-twain

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To The Person Sitting In Darkness - Mark Twain

... a discredited musket and do bandit's work under a flag which bandits have been accustomed to fear, not to follow; we have debauched America's honor and blackened her face before the world; but each detail was for the best. We know this ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 13) - Mark Twain

... ! I seized the bell-ropes and stopped the engines.         'Quarter twain! Quarter twain! Mark' twain!         I was helpless. I did not know what in the world to do. I was quaking from head to foot, and I could have hung my hat on my eyes ...

The Gilded Age (Chap. 4) - Mark Twain

... far below, the boat's speed slackened, and the pent steam began to whistle and the gauge-cocks to scream:         "By the mark twain!"         "Quar?ter?her?er?less twain!"         "Eight and a half!"         "Eight feet!"         "Seven-ana-half!"         Another jingling of ...

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Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 7) - Mark Twain

... better water than that, and ran it lower down; started out from the false point?mark twain?raised the second reef abreast the big snag in the bend, and had quarter less ...

The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Chap. 21) - Mark Twain

... signatures as before?for, by one chance in a million, a person might happen upon the right marks by pure guesswork, ONCE, therefore I wish to be tested twice."         He turned his back, and the two panes were quickly covered with ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 23) - Mark Twain

... that when I had seen one of these martyrs I had seen them all. They all have a marked family resemblance to each other, they dress alike, in coarse monkish robes and sandals, they are all bald ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 26) - Mark Twain

... from each other in the church, and support the roof, I could not work up to their real dimensions by any method of comparison. I knew that the faces of each were about the width of a very large dwelling-house front, (fifty ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 53) - Mark Twain

... starred with diamonds, which hangs above the hole within the altar, and his solemnity changes to lively admiration. He rises and faces the finely wrought figures of the Saviour and the malefactors uplifted upon their crosses behind ...

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The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 22) - Mark Twain

... , of course--and next the Church and the Great Square of St. Mark, the Bronze Horses, and the famous Lion of St. Mark.         We intended to go to the Bridge of Sighs, but happened into the Ducal Palace first--a building ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 9) - Mark Twain

... turned my back and inspected the stem marks and hummed a tune, a sort of easy indifference which I had prodigiously admired in Bixby and other great pilots. Once I inspected rather long, and when I faced to the front again my heart flew into ...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Chap. 31) - Mark Twain

... reason. He sat down by her and put his arms around her; she buried her face in his bosom, she clung to him, she poured out her terrors, her unavailing regrets, and the far echoes turned them ...

The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Chap. 2) - Mark Twain

... Negro doubted this. Roxy reeled in her tracks, and the color vanished out of her face; the others dropped to their knees as if they had been shot; tears gushed from their eyes, their supplicating ...

A Literary Nightmare - Mark Twain

... dejectedly into a seat. He was pale, worn; he was a wreck. He lifted his faded eyes to my face and said: "Ah, Mark, it was a ruinous investment that I made in those heartless rhymes. They have ridden me like a ...

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The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 58) - Mark Twain

... our right was the machine they call the Nilometer, a stone-column whose business it is to mark the rise of the river and prophecy whether it will reach only thirty-two feet ...

The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Chap. 11) - Mark Twain

... factory?hey, Dave, ain't it so? But never mind, he'll make his mark someday?finger mark, you know, he-he! But really, you want to let him take a shy at your palms once; it's worth twice the price of ...

The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (Chap. 19) - Mark Twain

... always cost him a sigh when he got home, for they never tallied with the finger marks on the knife handle.         As to the mysterious girl, Tom swore he knew no such girl, and did not remember ever ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 55) - Mark Twain

... again, and looked as they had looked in the old times?but I went to bed a hundred years old, every night?for meantime I had been seeing those faces as they are now.         Of course I suffered some surprises, along at first, before ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.6) - Mark Twain

... was. But when it was out, the weight gone, and my conscience rising to the surface, I glanced at her face to see the result.         There was none to see. At least none that I was expecting. There was a barely perceptible suggestion ...

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The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 12) - Mark Twain

... you would infallibly put the "English" on the wrong side of the hall. Dan was to mark while the doctor and I played. At the end of an hour neither of us had ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 19) - Mark Twain

... an old story that Matthews, the actor, was once lauding the ability of the human face to express the passions and emotions hidden in the breast. He said the countenance could disclose ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 50) - Mark Twain

... India-rubber, usually about forty inches long and tapering gradually from an inch in diameter to a point, it administers a blow which leaves its mark for time."?Scow Life in Egypt, by the same author.]?that whizzed through the air ...

The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 10) - Mark Twain

... prince's cheek once more, and he lifted a steady and indignant gaze to the man's face and said?         "'Tis but ill-breeding in such as thou to command me to speak. I tell thee now, as I told thee before, I am Edward, Prince ...

The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 33) - Mark Twain

... took care of that. He watched these people's faces narrowly, hoping to find a charitable one whose possessor might be willing to carry his name to the old lieutenant?as to trying to get into the palace himself, that was simply ...

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Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 10) - Mark Twain

... I had learned to read the face of the water as one would cull the news from the morning paper; and finally, when I had trained my dull memory to treasure up an endless array of soundings and crossing-marks, and keep ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 3.16) - Mark Twain

... torture; others did not believe that any amount of suffering could make her put her mark to a lying confession. There were fourteen men present, including the Bishop. Eleven of them voted dead ...

Life On The Mississippi (Chap. 31) - Mark Twain

... spirals, with that document by my side which bore the right-hand thumb-and-finger-marks of that unknown murderer, printed with the dearest blood?to me?that was ever shed on this earth! And many and many a time I had ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.4) - Mark Twain

... ; "girls can brag, but that's all they are good for. Let a thousand of them come face to face with a handful of soldiers once, if you want to see what running is like. Here's little Joan?next she'll be threatening ...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Chap. 30) - Mark Twain

... feebly and turned paler than ever. "He didn't stay with us," said Mrs. Harper, beginning to look uneasy. A marked anxiety came into Aunt Polly's face. "Joe Harper, have you seen my Tom this morning?" "No'm." "When did you see him ...

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The Gilded Age (Chap. 29) - Mark Twain

... .          "We learn that as the down noon express was leaving H?? yesterday a lady! (God save the mark) attempted to force herself into the already full palatial car. Conductor Slum, who is too old a bird ...

The Gilded Age (Chap. 5) - Mark Twain

... fill them up! Ain't any hay and oats? Well get some?have it charged to me?come, spin around, now! Now, Hawkins, the procession's ready; mark time, by the left flank, forward-march!"         And the Colonel took the lead, with ...

The Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories (Chap. 5) - Mark Twain

... in that old, cruel time prisoners were not allowed to see their friends, and sometimes they spent years in the jails without ever seeing a friendly face. I judged that the marks on the paper were an enchantment, and that the guards ...

The Prince and The Pauper (Chap. 5) - Mark Twain

... his hands, he exclaimed?         "Thou the King? Then am I undone indeed!"         This speech seemed to stun the King. His eyes wandered from face to face aimlessly, then rested, bewildered, upon the boy before him. Then he said in a tone of ...

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (Chap. 21) - Mark Twain

... find a sample of it there."         I closed up alongside of a burly fellow with a fat good-humored face, purposing to make myself agreeable and pick up some further crumbs of fact; but I had hardly more ...

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Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.5) - Mark Twain

... from the seat of war; but at intervals roving bands approached near enough for us to see the flush in the sky at night which marked where they were burning some farmstead or village, and we all knew, or at ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 1.7) - Mark Twain

... me this. You could not see me in the wood; how did you know I cut a mark in the tree?"         "Wait a little; I will soon come to that; then you will see."         "But tell me one thing now; what was that awful ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 2.5) - Mark Twain

... great march, and made her despise its dangers and fatigues? The King must see her face to face?and shall!' She dismissed me with those good words, and I know her promise will be ...

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (Chap. 3.20) - Mark Twain

... so sat, with her hands nestling in her lap, indifferent to everything, caring for nothing but rest. And she was so white again?white as alabaster.         How the faces of that packed mass of humanity lighted up with interest, and ...

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 29) - Mark Twain

... , here was nothing in the world betwixt me and sudden death but just them tattoo-marks. If they didn't find them? I couldn't bear to think about it; and yet, somehow, I couldn't think about nothing else. It got darker and ...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chap. 3) - Mark Twain

... over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn't see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the ...

The Innocents Abroad (Chap. 32) - Mark Twain

... the ancient temples. It was locked! So, after all, it seemed that we were not to see the great Parthenon face to face. We sat down and held a council of war. Result: the gate was only a flimsy structure ...

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